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10 Ridiculous Rules about WEB CRAWLING

Crawling the web for data can be a daunting task for even the most experienced developers. But with the right tools and techniques, it doesn’t have to be so difficult.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the most common mistakes that developers make when crawling the web. By avoiding these mistakes, you can make your web crawler more efficient, accurate, and reliable.

1. Not Using a User-Agent String

When you make an HTTP request, your browser (or other software) sends along a “user-agent” string to identify itself. This string tells the server what software you’re using, what operating system you’re on, and other important information.

If you’re making requests without a user-agent string, the server has no way of knowing who (or what) is making the request. As a result, the server may ignore your request, or return an error.

2. Not Checking for Robots.txt

Before you start crawling a website, you should always check for a “robots.txt” file. This file contains instructions for web crawlers (also known as “bots”), and can tell you which parts of the site you’re allowed to crawl.

If you don’t check for a robots.txt file before crawling, you could be wasting time and resources by crawling pages that you’re not supposed to.

3. Not Respecting the Crawl-Delay Directive

If a website’s robots.txt file contains a “crawl-delay” directive, you should make sure to respect it. This directive tells you how long to wait between requests to the same website.

If you don’t respect the crawl-delay directive, you could be making too many requests and overwhelming the server. This could result in your IP address being banned from the site.

4. Not Handling Cookies Properly

Cookies are small pieces of data that are sent by a website and stored on your computer. They’re often used to store information like login credentials or preferences.

When you make a request to a website, any cookies that are associated with that site will be sent along with the request. If you’re not handling cookies properly, you may end up making unnecessary requests, or even leaking sensitive information.

5. Not Handling Redirects Properly

When you make a request to a website, the server may respond with a “redirect” status code. This means that the server is telling you to make the same request to a different URL.

If you’re not handling redirects properly, you could end up making multiple requests for the same data. This is a waste of time and resources, and can slow down your crawler.

6. Not Parsing HTML Properly

HTML is the markup language that is used to structure web pages. When you make a request to a website, the server will send back the HTML for that page. You can check RemoteDBA for more information.

If you’re not parsing HTML properly, you could be missing out on important data, or making unnecessary requests.

7. Not Following Links Properly

When you’re crawling a website, it’s important to follow the links on each page. This will help you find new pages, and collect more data.

If you’re not following links properly, you may miss out on important data, or end up in a never-ending loop of requests.

8. Not Checking for Rate Limits

When you make too many requests to a website in a short period of time, you could be rate-limited. This means that the server will start ignoring your requests, or even return an error.

If you’re not checking for rate limits, you could end up making too many requests and slowing down your crawler.

9. Not Checking for Errors

When you’re crawling a website, it’s important to check for errors. This will help you identify problems, and fix them quickly.

If you’re not checking for errors, you may miss out on important data, or end up in a never-ending loop of requests.

10. Not Saving Your Data Properly

When you’re crawling a website, it’s important to save your data properly. This will help you keep track of what you’ve crawled, and make it easier to resume if your crawler is interrupted.

If you’re not saving your data properly, you may lose track of what you’ve already crawled, or have to start from scratch if your crawler is interrupted.

Conclusion:

Crawling a website can be a complex and time-consuming task. There are a number of things that you need to keep in mind, in order to do it properly. Failure to do so can result in wasted time and resources, or even missing out on important data.

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